April Roundup: POST-CINEMA: THEORIZING 21st-CENTURY FILM ebook, SEQUENCE on Analogue-Digital; Rascaroli & Sharma videos, plus more

  1. POST-CINEMA: THEORIZING 21st-CENTURY FILM – a wide-ranging and important open access edited collection, published by REFRAME Books;
  2. New SEQUENCE on the Analogue-Digital opposition;
  3. New videos in TALKS@MFM – Our continuing series of video recordings of research seminars and masterclasses;
  4. Mediático, Reframing Psychoanalysis, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates.

REFRAME‘s latest round up of open access publications and research website and project launches is given below.

1. POST-CINEMA: THEORIZING 21st-CENTURY FILM, a major new open access edited collection from REFRAME Books

We are very excited to announce the launch of a major scholarly collection edited by Shane Denson and Julia Leyda, and published by REFRAME’s open access ebook imprint (publisher of THE TABLET BOOK, 2015). If cinema and television, as the dominant media of the 20th century, shaped and reflected our cultural sensibilities, how do new digital media in the 21st century help to shape and reflect new forms of sensibility? In this collection, Denson and Leyda have gathered a range of essays that approach this question by way of a critical engagement with the notion of “post-cinema.” Contributors explore key experiential, technological, political, historical, and ecological aspects of the transition from a cinematic to a post-cinematic media regime and articulate both continuities and disjunctures between film’s first and second centuries.

Contributors include: Caetlin Benson-Allott, Paul Bowman, Felix Brinker, Kristopher L. Cannon, Francesco Casetti, Steen Christiansen, Elena del Río, Rosalind Galt, Therese Grisham, Richard Grusin, Leon Gurevitch, Mark B. N. Hansen, Bruce Isaacs, Adrian Ivakhiv, Kylie Jarrett, Selmin Kara, ​Patricia MacCormack, Lev Manovich, Ruth Mayer, Michael O’Rourke, Patricia Pisters, Alessandra Raengo, David Rambo, Nicholas Rombes, Sergi Sánchez, Karin Sellberg, Steven Shaviro, Michael Loren Siegel, Vivian Sobchack, Billy Stevenson, Andreas Sudmann.

The book appears first in an easily navigable web and mobile browser format from which chapter PDFs may be generated and saved (see the foot of each entry). The collection will shortly appear in a collected PDF edition, followed by EPUB and MOBI formats readable on most e-readers. Online at: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/post-cinema/.

2. The latest issue of SEQUENCE: Serial Studies in Media, Film and Music, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, and sequential edited-collection format has been published.

SEQUENCE Four: Analogue-Digital offers its readers, and potential interlocutors, space for reflection on the many forms and techniques of recombinatory media and culture. The inaugural contribution to this issue, and to this topic, is by Paul Atkinson, a specialist in the philosophy of science, media theory and visual culture, based at Monash University in Melbourne. Atkinson’s essay for SEQUENCE (4.1 [2016]— ‘THINKING WITH DIGITS: Cinema and the Digital-Analogue Opposition’ offers a compelling exploration of what is at stake when we deploy these, now binary terms. He sets out to clarify the representational differences between them, among other distinctions:

It is often pronounced that we live in a digital age and that our social and aesthetic beliefs are underpinned by the concept of digitality. But when a term is used to herald a broad cultural change it loses much of its specificity and critical purpose. The digital becomes a shibboleth of the new and its counterpart, the analogue, a locus for nostalgia and a presumed indexical connection with the real. We are at a point now in the study of media and cinema, when it is important to rethink both the analogue and the digital if they are to continue to have any critical value. This is not a plea to limit discussion to technological affordances, for the terms precede the many recent technologies to which they are applied. Rather it is a call to reconsider the digital-analogue distinction as a mode of representation and how this might apply to cinema. This is not just a matter of providing a clear definition in the manner favoured by philosophy, because any theoretical repositioning has to bear some relationship to the material, aesthetic and spectatorial aspects of cinema. The representational differences must affect the way we watch films as well as provide a means for understanding distinct filmmaking practices. In short, it is about redeploying the analogue-digital distinction as a mode of thinking in cinema – in terms of both reason and aesthetics – that extends well beyond the application of specific technologies.

 

3. TALKS@MFM REFRAME continues with its series of video and audio recordings of research presentations and masterclasses held at the School of Media, Film and Music, University of Sussex.

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Including: 

 

4. Mediático, Reframing Psychoanalysis, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates

AT MEDIÁTICO:

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AT REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS

 


AT THE AUDIOVISUAL ESSAY

Ferguson-

 

 

AT REFRAMING ACTIVISM:

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December Roundup: Reframing Psychoanalysis; Psychogeography of Lewes; TALKS@MFM; SEQUENCE on Godard and mashup; Other updates

  1. REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS website launched for the CHASE Psychoanalysis Network
  2. NEW PATHWAYS: A Psychogeography of Lewes and True Tales from the Old Hill projects launched
  3. TALKS@MFM – Our new series of recordings of research seminars and masterclasses
  4. New SEQUENCE on Re/De-Composition: Sampling, Mashups, Remix, Glitch
  5. Mediático, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates

 

REFRAME‘s latest round up of open access publications and research website and project launches is given below.

  1. REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS website launched for the CHASE Psychoanalysis Network

REFRAME_PSYCHO_withoutpresents-2

REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS is a focus for research in psychoanalysis across the Consortium for Humanities and the Arts South-East England (CHASE). CHASE brings together nine leading institutions engaged in collaborative research activities in the arts and humanities, including an AHRC doctoral training partnership. These are the Universities of  East AngliaEssexKent and Sussex, the Open UniversityThe Courtauld Institute of ArtGoldsmiths, University of LondonBirkbeck, University of London and SOAS, University of London.

It is central to the CHASE ethos that serious disciplinary research is interdisciplinary, and should also encourage emerging fields of study and creative practice. CHASE includes a large number of faculty and doctoral researchers and practitioners engaged in psychoanalysis across a range of disciplines and inter-disciplines. Providing a platform for that research, the REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS website engages with emerging forms of study in psychoanalysis, including experiments in new forms of attention and communication.  It will benefit in this endeavour from CHASE’s partnerships with leading organisations in the creative and public sectors. Also follow REPSYCHOANALYSE for news updates on Twitter.

 

2. NEW PATHWAYS: A Psychogeography of Lewes website and True Tales from the Old Hill project launched

Travel writing, like all life writing, is useful, truthful and sometimes beautiful. But in 2015, the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research at the University of Sussex jumped off track to enjoy the beauty of useless travelling and the art that can be made from it. We took to the town of Lewes for these micro-journeys, because Lewes is on our doorstep (the psychogeographer doesn’t need the exotic), because Lewes and its environs are dreamy, odd and old, if only faintly urban. While the town may be well known for its spectacular Bonfire Night revels (psychogeographical in their own way), we—researchers, writers, filmmakers, artists—got outside the guidebooks to play a little with the town, with truth and ourselves too.

We are now delighted to publish the results of this initiative on REFRAME: NEW PATHWAYS: A Psychogeography of Lewes. As a collection of concise written essays, photo essays, films, audio-recordings and ‘mappenings’, the psychogeographical works presented here uncover the usually ignored textures and soundscapes of the environment we traversed.

Also, on 1 December, a offline sister publication to New Pathways was launched: True Tales from the Old Hill, an anthology of life writing published in collaboration with the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research at the University of Sussex. Inspired by Paul Auster’s True Tales of American Life and edited by Rachel Cole and Jeremy Page with Katie Leacock and Sally Willow, the anthology includes more than fifty ‘true tales’ by contributors resident in or near Lewes, many of them – Mikey Cuddihy, Beth Miller, Minoli Salgado and Janet Sutherland among them – familiar names. True Tales from the Old Hill is available post free from The Frogmore Press also at £10.00 per copy.

 

3. TALKS@MFM REFRAME presents a new series of video and audio recordings of research presentations and masterclasses held at the School of Media, Film and Music, University of Sussex.

REFRAME_MFM_TALKS1

Including: “Gleaning, Détournement and the Compilation Film: Some thoughts on For One More Hour With You / Un’ora Sola Ti Vorrei (Alina Marazzi, 2002)” by LAURA MULVEY (Professor of Film and Media Studies at Birkbeck, University of London) October 13th, 2015, [Video Recording] FURTHER DETAILS; Glass and Game: The Speculative Girl Hero by CATHERINE DRISCOLL (Professor of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney) September 30th, 2015. [Video recording] FURTHER DETAILS; and Explorations in the Dark: How I Told 300 Stories Without a Single Image” by MATT THOMPSON (Director of Rockethouse Productions) October 2015. [Video recording] FURTHER DETAILS

 

4. The latest issue of SEQUENCE: Serial Studies in Media, Film and Music, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, and sequential edited-collection format.

SLIDER_SEQUENCE_THREE

SEQUENCE Three: Re/De-Composition: Sampling, Mashups, Remix, Glitch offers its readers, and potential interlocutors, space for reflection on the many forms and techniques of recombinatory media and culture. The inaugural contribution to this issue, and to this topic, is by Albertine Fox, a specialist in the later works of that most incorporative of filmmakers, Jean-Luc Godard.

Fox’s essay for SEQUENCE—’”EXTREME STATES: Remixing Cinema, Visual Art and Music in Godard’s Puissance de la parole (3.1 [2015])is an insightful exploration of the French filmmaker’s inventive techniques of fragmentation, decontextualization and recombination in his videographic work from the late 1980s, a period in which, as Fox argues, video came ‘into its own [both for Godard and other artists] as a poetic and interdisciplinary artistic force.’ For Fox, ‘Godard is devoted to the task of fearlessly re-instilling past forms of the image into new technological contexts, while embracing the instantaneousness of the medium’s present tense.’ She posits that in Godard’s version of the practice, ‘[v]ideo mashup is a plural form that thwarts our customary listening and viewing strategies, compelling us to participate in a volatile, arbitrary and indeterminate sense-making process’

 

5. Mediático, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates

AT MEDIÁTICO:

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AT THE AUDIOVISUAL ESSAY

Ferguson-

 

 

 

 

AT REFRAMING ACTIVISM:

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New Music! Ed Hughes and the New Music Players

Voyage to the Moon (2015) for flute, clarinet, violin, cello and piano by Ed Hughes: a new score to Georges Méliès’s Le Voyage dans la Lune (1902) for flute, clarinet, violin, cello and piano (14′). Written for The New Music Players and Orchestra of Sound and Light for concerts in London and Sussex (see below) with funding support from the RVW Trust and Arts Council England.

REFRAME‘s blog returns from a summer break with news of world premieres of musical work by one of its regular collaborators and subjects, composer and Head of the University of Sussex’s Music Department in the School of Media, Film and Music, Ed Hughes (see a REFRAME Conversations video about Hughes’ work).

New Music Players, a top UK ensemble specialising in contemporary music, founded by Hughes, mark 150 years since the publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland with two concerts of ]new music for very early silent film by Hughes (also its artistic director) plus four new works for ensemble by postgraduate composers at the University of Sussex.

  • Thursday 24 September 2015 at 7pm. Meeting House, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RH. Tickets: £10 (students £6) available on the door
    • Featuring four new works by University of Sussex postgraduate composers Danny Bright, Barnaby Hollington, Tom Reid and Lee Westwood plus the world premiere of Ed Hughes’s Alice in Wonderland and Voyage to the Moon at University of Sussex on 24 September 2015)
  • Friday 25 September 2015 at 7.30pm at The Warehouse, 13 Theed Street, Waterloo, London SE1 8ST. Tickets: £10 (students and under 16s £6) available http://www.wegottickets.com/newmusicplayers or on the door.
    • Featuring the premiere of Ed Hughes’s Night Music with pianist Richard Casey.

FULL PRESS RELEASE DOWNLOADABLE HERE

Programme details

Ed Hughes’s work over the last decade has been influenced by music and the moving image, and in particular responses to silent film. Two new works extend this interest to very early and iconic films from England and France, Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow’s Alice and Wonderland (1903) and George Méliès’s Voyage to the Moon (1902) which both in different ways explore ideas of fantasy and the dreamworld, also common to Ed Hughes’s recent opera When the Flame Dies.

In Hughes’s Night Music, for solo piano and live electronics, the virtuoso and often dissonant soundworld of the piano is counterpointed with pure electronic sounds, and archive film from the aerial campaign conducted by the allies in the second world war: the intention is to revisit these difficult images in order to obtain a nuanced and reflective appreciation of their moral complexity, through the use of music and silent film.

Danny Bright’s Branch Lines is one of a number of works that explore notions of ‘sonic ghosting’ in relation to place, memory, and temporality. The composition responds to the experience of visiting Causey Arch, near Tanfield in County Durham, and its subsequent echoes, semblances and apparitions.

Barnaby Hollington’s Nevermore explores the boundary between tonality and so-called ‘atonality’ or ‘post-tonality’. The primary focus is melodic and harmonic. In that regard, there are numerous, disparate, very specific technical influences: Gesualdo, Mozart, Milhaud, Krenek, Messiaen, Boulez, Donatoni, Benjamin…

Tom Reid’s The Hammer Revisited derives harmonic and melodic material from the first three bars of Avant L’Artisanat Furieux (‘Before the Furious Craftsmanship’), from Le Marteau sans Maitre (‘The Hammer Unleashed’) by Pierre Boulez.
The rhythmic ideas were conceived independently, with syncopated gestures and dotted dance rhythms especially prominent. In the middle section, two pulsating melodic patterns emerge – one improvisatory, the other more premeditated – and unfold at conflicting speeds. The slow pedal bass implies a third tempo, creating further disruption.

Lee Westwood writes about his …and the stars were like pinpricks in the black fabric of night… : According to Medieval scholars, the stars were believed to be holes in the firmament, through which could be seen an all-encompassing fire. This firmament formed the last of the seven celestial orbs, a static outer layer, the remaining six rotating at different rates and distances around the Earth, carrying with them what appeared as the Sun, Moon and planets. The voices in this work could be viewed as a musical metaphor for those holes through which light is let through, flickering at different rates/speeds/distances as they encircle the listener: 8 of the pitches are fixed, 4 are ‘in orbit’, those larger heavenly bodies often shining brighter than the rest. Through this process I have tried to endow the music with, if not timelessness, then a certain temporal elasticity, weightless, as if suspended in space outside of normal time.

For further press information and images please contact: Liz Webb Management (Email: lizwebbmanagement@gmail.com; Tel: 01273 470068 or 07952 007837; www.lizwebb.org.uk

Presenting REFRAME Books!

REFRAME Books' inaugural publication

REFRAME is proud to announce the launch of its new publishing imprint REFRAME Books. The imprint will focus on publishing open access scholarly contributions to the fields of media, film, music, cultural studies, the digital humanities, and journalism, in a variety of e-reading formats.

REFRAME Books launches with the publication of The Tablet Bookedited by Caroline BassettRyan BurnsRussell Glasson and Kate O’Riordan, a collection of seven original research essays which mobilise a range of perspectives and approaches in thinking about and understanding the tablet computer.

This book arose in response to discussion at the Tablet Symposium held at the University of Sussex in April 2013, an event funded by the Centre for Material Digital Culture.

REFRAME Books credits

  • Book Design and Layout Editor: Tanya Kant
  • Technical Editors: Russell Glasson and Tanya Kant
  • Managing Editor: Catherine Grant
  • Publisher contact: reframe.us@gmail.com
  • Publisher’s ISBN Prefix: 978-0-9931996

REFRAME is an open access academic digital platform for the online practice, publication and curation of internationally produced research and scholarship. It is supported by the School of Media, Film and Music, University of Sussex, UK.

UPDATE: Opera and the Media of the Future; Pam Cook at SEQUENCE; Dolores Tierney on BIRDMAN; Psychogeography of Lewes; Re.Framing Activism

  1. NEW! Pam Cook on READING MILDRED PIERCE at SEQUENCE TwoVideo recordings of the “Opera and the Media of the Future” event now online
  2. Pam Cook on Reading Mildred Pierce at SEQUENCE
  3. Dolores Tierney on the 2015 Academy Award winning ‘Best Film’ Birdman, directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu
  4. New Pathways: A Psychogeographical Exploration of Lewes
  5. Re.Framing Activism under new management!

 

1. Video recordings of the “Opera and the Media of the Future” event now online

OMF event imageWe present online audiovisual documentation of much of the programme of the inaugural Opera and the Media of the Future event, which was held at Glyndebourne on October 24-25th, 2014. (The OMF project is directed by Evelyn Ficarra and Nick Till). Click here for the full set of links.

 

2. Pam Cook on Reading Mildred Pierce at SEQUENCE

Screenshot from MILDRED PIERCE (Todd Haynes/HBO: © 2011 Home Box Office Inc)We have just published a new essay at REFRAME‘s peer-reviewed publication SEQUENCE: Serial Studies in Media, Film: esteemed film scholar Pam Cook on Todd Haynes’ HBO television miniseries Mildred Pierce (2011). Cook’s essay (and video essays) forms the second instalment in SEQUENCE Two: We Need to Talk about the Maternal Melodrama, and follows on from Sue Thornham‘s inaugural discussion of Lynne Ramsay’s critical reappraisal of the maternal melodrama in We Need to Talk about Kevin (2011), which analysed in detail the film’s exploration of issues of female identity, agency and control. Cook’s article may be found here: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/sequence2/archive/sequence-2-2/. SEQUENCE is co-edited by Katherine Farrimond, Russell Glasson, and Catherine Grant.

 

3. Dolores Tierney on the 2015 Academy Award winning ‘Best Film’ Birdman, directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu

Screenshot from BIRDMAN (Alejandro González Iñárritu, 2014)The latest entry at the lively Mediático website is by Mexican cinema specialist Dolores Tierney. In it, she critically assesses the latest ‘transnational’ film by Iñárrituone of the directors whose work forms the focus of her latest book project: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/mediatico/2015/02/23/birdman-or-the-unexpected-virtue-of-ignorance-alejandro-gonzalez-inarritu-2014/Mediático is co-edited by Juan Ramos, Dolores Tierney and Catherine Grant.

 

4. New Pathways: A Psychogeographical Exploration of Lewes

"New Pathways" banner image for REFRAMEPending the creation of a bespoke website, a new REFRAME page has been set up to publicise and call for contributions to a new project from the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research, in partnership with REFRAME. The outcome will be a new collection of life writing or audio/visual essays based on psychogeographical explorations of the town of Lewes and the area defined by Lewes District Council. More information about the project can be found here: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/reframe-projects/reframe-projects-and-publications/pol/. This project is directed by Margaretta Jolly, Lyn Thomas, and Adam Whitehall, and the publication will be co-edited by them and Catherine Grant for REFRAME.

 

5. Re.Framing Activism under new management!

reframing_metaslidernewThis very popular website was founded by Rachel Tavernor, with Marina Fuser, in 2013. After a short hiatus, the editorial reins have been very ably taken up by our colleagues Eleftheria Lekakis. A recent entry was published by Pollyanna Ruiz on her new book Articulating Dissent; Protest and the Public Spherehttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/activistmedia/2015/02/articulating-dissent-protest-and-the-public-sphere/. Marina Fuser has also recently contributed a consideration of the recent attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdohttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/activistmedia/2015/01/decolonizing-coexistence-beyond-hebdo/.

 

If you’d like to contribute to any of the above publications, please email REFRAME. If you’d like to explore the range of REFRAME projects published to date. please visit this page: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/reframe-projects/.

November Round Up: Web Operas, Media Activism, Psychogeography, Cinematic Melancholia and Optimism!

  1. Mini Web Operas launched online and at Glyndebourne by the Opera and the Media of the Future project
  2. Re. Framing Activism website under new editorship
  3. New project call for submissions: THE PSYCHOGEOGRAPHY OF LEWES
  4. New report by Belén Vidal on the San Sebastián Film Festival at Mediático
  5. New eBook versions of articles in SEQUENCE One Planet Melancholia

REFRAME‘s latest round up of open access publications and research website and project launches is given below.

 

1. Mini Web Operas launched online and at Glyndebourne by the Opera and the Media of the Future project

Two new mini web operas — joint winners of a commission by the Opera and the Media of the Future project —were launched at the inaugural OMF event at Glyndebourne (October 23-24, 2014). REFRAME has published websites devoted to both projects:

A. RUR (Rossum’s Universal Replicants) by Martin Rieser (artist) and Andrew Hugill (composer). A new genre of opera is emerging from digital culture: a new way of telling stories and generating and reaching audiences. The RUR mini-web opera provides an explosive encounter between new technologies and the long-established tradition of opera. RUR transforms the way in which operatic works are produced and consumed. Audiences are engaged in active participation through Social Media, and the roles of the collaborators in a production are changed.
     The operatic experience becomes networked, asynchronous and immersive. Built around coordinated social media delivery relating the opera- story, it is displayed as a series of live newslinks and updates: fabricated histories and news, combined as Twitter feeds, Facebook postings, blog posts and Youtube materials webcast to the audience’s mobile surfaces and social media interfaces as a media wall.
     As in Karel Capek’s visionary 1920s play, this mini-opera explores the theme of science used for profit without thought of consequences, where ‘robots’ are actually organic and physically indistinguishable replicants of human, brought up to date in a contemporary setting.  Background images are sourced from Youtube or created from online flickr images, which have been animated by the artist through morphing software.
     The music contrasts replicant with human voices. In one song, a female replicant sings a blues lament accompanied by  prepared piano. In another, a replicant chorus chants machine songs against a backdrop of rhythmical synthesiser sounds. By contrast, two extended arias are sung by a soprano and a tenor: a fervent prayer that layers up pianos and glass harmonica, and a lyrical love song with tuned percussion, strings and solo cello.
     In future incarnations the authors envisage using theatre-in-the-round through 3D technologies, embedded in a mobile application working with devices such as Occulus Rift, putting the audience in the centre of three-dimensional scenography and motion-captured avatars, enacting the opera, as in their earlier work “Secret Garden”. (Martin Rieser)

RUR (Rossum’s Universal Replicants) may be accessed herehttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/rur/.

B. YOU ARE HERE is an experimental opera by composer Miika Hyytiäinen and director Jaakko Nousiainen that connects the Glyndebourne opera house with the three opera houses in Berlin, the Staatsoper, Komische Oper and Deutsche Oper Berlin. Premiered in the premises of the Glyndebourne Opera, YOU ARE HERE is encountered in the form of visual QR code ’artworks’ that can be activated with smartphone cameras. Each code connects to an opera video filmed in Berlin, forming a bridge between the two locations and two moments in time. (Jaakko Nousiainen)

You Are Here may be accessed herehttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/youarehere/.

 

2. Re. Framing Activism website under new editorship

Dr Eleftheria Lekakis, Lecturer in Media and Communication in the School of Media, Film and Music at the University of Sussex (@eleftheriafm), has taken over the role of editor of the Re. Framing Activism website collective. Eleftheria’s research focuses on aspects of global communication which stem from the intersection of politics, economy and culture. In an earlier post at the website, she introduced her recent book on Coffee Activism. A new post has been published by Anne Kaun (Södertörn University) on the protest spaces of community archives and cultural production. And the Facebook page for the website is also being regularly updated with links to online material of interest, especially related research on media activism.

 

3. New project call for submissions: THE PSYCHOGEOGRAPHY OF LEWES

A new REFRAME project has launched in conjunction with the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research, University of Sussex. We are seeking to publish a new collection of psychogeographical life writing or audiovisual essays.

Writers, filmmakers and artists are therefore invited to submit a prose piece of up to 750 words in length, or an audiovisual, audio or visual feature, under the rubric ‘The psychogeography of Lewes’. This includes the town of Lewes and the area defined by Lewes District Council. To find out more about the project, or about the possibilities of psychogeography as a method please visit the call for submissions webpage here at REFRAMEhttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/reframe-projects/reframe-projects-and-publications/pol/

4. New report by Belén Vidal on the San Sebastián Film Festival at Mediático

Mediático is delighted to present a report on the 62nd International San Sebastian Film Festival (19/27 September, 2014) by Belén Vidal, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at King’s College, London. Vidal is author of Figuring the Past: Period Film and the Mannerist Aesthetic (Amsterdam University Press, 2012) and Heritage Film: Nation, Genre and Representation (Wallflower Press/Columbia University Press, 2012), and co-editor of The Biopic in Contemporary Film Culture (with Tom Brown, Routledge, 2014) and Cinema at the Periphery (with Dina Iordanova and David Martin-Jones, Wayne State University Press, 2010). [Note: scholars and fans of the film director Icíar Bollaín, mentioned, below, might like to revisit Mediático next week for some great new resources on her work.)

5. New eBook versions of articles in SEQUENCE One Planet Melancholia

As is its brief, SEQUENCE, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, media, film and music studies serial publication has followed up its web publication of a number of articles with publication in other eReading formats. The new and existing formats are set out below.

SEQUENCE One: Planet Melancholia

Steven Shaviro, ‘MELANCHOLIA, or, The Romantic Anti-Sublime’, SEQUENCE, 1.1, 2012 is available in the following free eBook versions:

MOBI             EPUB            PDF            Kindle (azw3)

NEW Rupert Read,’An Allegory of a ‘Therapeutic’ Reading of a Film: Of MELANCHOLIA’, SEQUENCE 1.2 2014  is available in the following free eBook versions:

MOBI             EPUB            PDF            Kindle (azw3)

NEW Richard Grusin, ‘Post-Cinematic Atavism’, SEQUENCE, 1.3, 2014 is available in the following free eBook versions:

MOBI             EPUB            PDF            Kindle (azw3)

NEW Selmin Kara, ‘BEASTS OF THE DIGITAL WILD: Primordigital Cinema and the Question of Origins’, SEQUENCE, 1.4, 2014 is available in the following free eBook versions:

MOBI             EPUB           PDF            Kindle (azw3)

SEQUENCE Two: We Need to Talk about Maternal Melodrama

Sue Thornham’s ‘A HATRED SO INTENSE….: We Need to Talk about Kevin, Postfeminism and Women’s Cinema’, SEQUENCE, 2.1, 2013will shortly be available in the following free eBook versions:

MOBI             EPUB            PDF             Kindle (azw3)

NEW website project: THE AUDIOVISUAL ESSAY – PRACTICE & THEORY

REFRAME_metaslider_AV_essay_no_readmoreREFRAME is excited to announce the launch of possibly its most international project to date, one with exciting connections to several highly esteemed publications in film and media studies, as well as important developments and events in our field.

The Audiovisual Essay is a new website devoted to the practice and theory of videographic film and moving image studies. This website will serve three main functions:

  • As an online repository for the papers, discussions and screening programme of an international conference and workshop on The Audiovisual Essay: Practice and Theory, organised by Adrian Martin and Cristina Álvarez López (supported by and Vinzenz Hediger of Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany). These events took place in November 2013 at the DeutschesFilmmuseum – Deutsches Filminstitut, in Frankfurt in partnership with Film and Audiovisual Media at Goethe University. The section of the website where these materials can be accessed — titled The Frankfurt Papers (co-edited by Cristina Álvarez López, Catherine Grant and Adrian Martin) — can be found here.
  • As a companion publication to issue 1.3 of the new peer-reviewed journal [in]Transition, A collaboration betweenMediaCommons and the Society for Cinema and Media Studies’ official publication, Cinema Journal, [in]Transition is the first peer-reviewed academic periodical specifically given over to videographic film and moving image studies. Issue 1.3(edited by Catherine Grant), was devoted to a sustained reflection on the practice and theory of the audiovisual essay form, with particular reference to its emerging procedures and uses in film and moving image criticism and research. The table of contents for this section (also edited by Catherine Grant) can be found here.
  • And it will also continue as a rolling publication for continuing reflections on and resources concerning the practice and theory of the audiovisual essay. The table of contents for this section (co-edited by Cristina Álvarez López, Catherine Grant, Chiara Grizzaffi, Hoi Lun Law, Adrian Martin, Lara Perski) can be found here.

Why not take a look at some of the emerging audiovisual approaches to audiovisual subjects: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/audiovisualessay/

Catherine Grant,
Producer/Director of the Audiovisual Essay website

Editor of REFRAME
September 2014

Latest news from REFRAME: Opera and the Media of the Future; Testament of Cocteau; MEDIÁTICO Video blog and more!

  1. Launch of the OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE website at REFRAME
  2. The latest REFRAME Conversations project: TESTAMENT OF COCTEAU – Orphée on film and in opera.
  3. New videoblog at MEDIÁTICO
  4. Study of controversial Spanish documentary ROCÍO, also at MEDIÁTICO

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REFRAME‘s latest round up of open access publications and research website launches is given below. Some further important launches will take place later this month, so be sure to come back for those!

1. Launch of the OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE website at REFRAME

Opera and the Media of the Future (OMF) is a new research initiative by The Centre for Research in Opera and Music Theatre (CROMT) to examine the challenges and opportunities of new media technologies for the future of opera. The project will be launched by a two-day event hosted by Glyndebourne Operabringing academics, artists and opera professionals together to examine a wide range of issues from opera cinecasts and webcasts to the use of new media platforms for audience development, marketing and education and the implications of new media for the forms of opera itself. The event will also include the presentation of two specially commissioned mini web operas. These will be published online by REFRAME/OMF. Click here for more information about OMFhttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/omf/

2. The latest REFRAME Conversations project: TESTAMENT OF COCTEAU 

For its latest video, REFRAME Conversations brought together two men with a shared interest in the life and work of French writer, artist and filmmaker Jean Cocteau:

The two discussed their mutual interest in Cocteau’s work and its legacy, with particular reference to Orphée as well as to Hughes and Morris’s operatic reinterpretation of the film. To watch the video please click herehttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/conversations/archive2014/testament-of-cocteau-orphee-on-film-and-in-opera/

3. New videoblog at MEDIÁTICO on Latin American remakes of US television series

MEDIÁTICO presented the first episode in its new, occasional, video blog series in which scholars and media practitioners reflect on aspects of Latin(o/a) American, Spanish and Portuguese media cultures. This inaugural vlog features founding co-editor Juan Ramos discussing an aspect of his Media and Cultural Studies PhD research on Latin TV dramas at the University of Sussex, in particular the phenomenon of Latin American remakes of US television series, including Metástasis, the Breaking Bad remake currently airing on US television. To watch the video and read an accompanying text, please click herehttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/mediatico/2014/08/18/vlog-ep-1-metastasis/

4. Study of controversial Spanish documentary ROCÍO at MEDIÁTICO

This website also brought us a brilliantly illustrated and highly informative essay by Rebecca Naughten on ROCÍO (Fernando Ruiz Vergara, 1980), an important Spanish documentary about repression and censorship in the immediate post-Francoist era: 

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End of July updates! SEQUENCE 1.3 & 1.4, new Mediático video essay, web opera winners and SusNet on Queer Feminist Media Praxis

FOUR great news items here at REFRAME today:

  1. New articles published at SEQUENCE One: Planet Melancholia
  2. New Eduardo Coutinho video essay tribute at MEDIÁTICO
  3. OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE Mini Web Opera Call – Result
  4. SusNet collaboration with ADA: A Journal of Gender, New Media and Technology

1. New articles published at SEQUENCE One: Planet Melancholia
SEQUENCE, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, sequential edited-collection,  is delighted to announce the publication of two further individual responses — by esteemed media studies scholars Richard Grusin and Selmin Kara — to Steven Shaviro’s magisterial article “MELANCHOLIA, Or The Romantic Anti-Sublime”, SEQUENCE 1.1 (2012), the launch essay for PLANET MELANCHOLIA, the inaugural issue of SEQUENCE, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, media, film and music studies serial publication.

Following Rupert Read’s engagement with Shaviro in SEQUENCE 1.2, which offered a personal, affective (and deeply philosophical) account of Lars von Trier’s 2011 film Melancholia, in their very fine, equally philosophically-informed, contributions Grusin and Kara turn their detailed attention, respectively, to the questions of “post-cinematic atavism” and “primordigitality” raised by the hybrid analog/digital technical and aesthetic contexts of a number of recent films, including Melancholia as well as Michel Hazanavicius’s The Artist (2011), Martin Scorsese’s Hugo (2011), Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life (2011), Benh Zeitlin’s Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), and Patricio Guzmán’s Nostalgia for the Light (2010) .

SEQUENCE continues to invite further responses to Shaviro’s article as well as to those which have followed it in the SEQUENCE One thread, as well as to SEQUENCE Two: We Need to Talk about the Maternal Melodrama‘.

2. New Eduardo Coutinho video essay tribute at MEDIÁTICO
Mediático, REFRAME‘s website devoted to Latin(o/a) American, Spanish and Portuguese media cultures, is proud to present a remarkable new video essay made in tribute to the work of the late Brazilian documentarist Eduardo Coutinho by Michael Chanan, Professor of Film and Video at Roehampton University, London. This work complements Mediático’s earlier published tribute to Coutinho, headed by a written study of his work by Cecilia Sayad.

3. OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE Mini Web Opera Call – Result
The University of Sussex Centre for Opera and Music Theatre (CROMT) is delighted to announce the result of our recent Call for Proposals for a Mini Web Opera, to be showcased online and at the Opera and the Media of the Future event in October. The original call can be seen here:
http://www.soundandmusic.org/resources/opportunities/2014/mini-web-opera-call
The panel reviewed 17 proposals, and we were gratified by the amount of creativity and innovation on offer. We awarded modest development funds to two proposals:

The resulting works will be hosted on the REFRAME website network. So, watch this space!

The panel also wished to commend proposals from Elizabeth Swift, Jasmin Rodgman and Pietro Dossena.

4. SusNet collaboration with ADA: A Journal of Gender, New Media and Technology
In June, we announced the launch of SusNet, a new website published at REFRAME for the EPSRC CCN+ funded, Sustaining Networked Knowledge: Expertise, Feminist Media Production, Art and Activism Project (SusNet), based at the University of Sussex.

SusNet is coordinated by Kate O’Riordan and Aristea Fotopoulou and brings together feminist cultural production, art and activist practices and enables exchanges between different researchers, activists, artists and aims to contribute to knowledge exchanges across these areas and beyond.

Since the website launched, the special issue, edited by SusNet‘s coordinators, of ADA: A Journal of Gender, New Media and Technology — on Queer, Feminist Media Praxis — has been published and its contents can be found here: http://adanewmedia.org/issues/issue-archives/issue5/.

Announcing SusNet – Sustaining Networked Knowledge: Expertise, Feminist Media Production, Art and Activism

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REFRAME is delighted to announce the launch of SusNet, a new website published at its platform for the EPSRC CCN+ funded, Sustaining Networked Knowledge: Expertise, Feminist Media Production, Art and Activism Project (SusNet), based at the University of Sussex. SusNet is co-ordinated by Kate O’Riordan and Aristea Fotopoulou, with further input from other participants in the project.

The SusNet network brings together feminist cultural production, art and activist practices and enables exchanges between different researchers, activists, artists and aims to contribute to knowledge exchanges across these areas and beyond. Its primary nodes are the CCN+ Expertise Workshop, the 2013 Lesbian Lives Conference, the May 2013 Queer, Feminist Social Media Praxis workshop at the University of Sussex https://queerfemdigiact.wordpress.com/, the (forthcoming) special edition of ADA Issue 5: Queer, Feminist Media Praxis, http://adanewmedia.org, and the FemTechNet panel and SusNet launch at Postdigital: Critical Responses.
In bringing these nodes together the network aims to draw on a history of approaches to engagement with digital media, in order to stimulate new forms of engagement and to develop a flexible template for networked knowledge production. The SusNet website explores new publishing, research, teaching methods and archives. In its REFRAME iteration, it is intended to provide a dynamic platform for the mapping and visualization of the network nodes, people and content to provide an architecture of participation as well as embed content in a digital materialization of the network. The material archived at the REFRAME website is principally in video/blog format.