April Roundup: POST-CINEMA: THEORIZING 21st-CENTURY FILM ebook, SEQUENCE on Analogue-Digital; Rascaroli & Sharma videos, plus more

  1. POST-CINEMA: THEORIZING 21st-CENTURY FILM – a wide-ranging and important open access edited collection, published by REFRAME Books;
  2. New SEQUENCE on the Analogue-Digital opposition;
  3. New videos in TALKS@MFM – Our continuing series of video recordings of research seminars and masterclasses;
  4. Mediático, Reframing Psychoanalysis, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates.

REFRAME‘s latest round up of open access publications and research website and project launches is given below.

1. POST-CINEMA: THEORIZING 21st-CENTURY FILM, a major new open access edited collection from REFRAME Books

We are very excited to announce the launch of a major scholarly collection edited by Shane Denson and Julia Leyda, and published by REFRAME’s open access ebook imprint (publisher of THE TABLET BOOK, 2015). If cinema and television, as the dominant media of the 20th century, shaped and reflected our cultural sensibilities, how do new digital media in the 21st century help to shape and reflect new forms of sensibility? In this collection, Denson and Leyda have gathered a range of essays that approach this question by way of a critical engagement with the notion of “post-cinema.” Contributors explore key experiential, technological, political, historical, and ecological aspects of the transition from a cinematic to a post-cinematic media regime and articulate both continuities and disjunctures between film’s first and second centuries.

Contributors include: Caetlin Benson-Allott, Paul Bowman, Felix Brinker, Kristopher L. Cannon, Francesco Casetti, Steen Christiansen, Elena del Río, Rosalind Galt, Therese Grisham, Richard Grusin, Leon Gurevitch, Mark B. N. Hansen, Bruce Isaacs, Adrian Ivakhiv, Kylie Jarrett, Selmin Kara, ​Patricia MacCormack, Lev Manovich, Ruth Mayer, Michael O’Rourke, Patricia Pisters, Alessandra Raengo, David Rambo, Nicholas Rombes, Sergi Sánchez, Karin Sellberg, Steven Shaviro, Michael Loren Siegel, Vivian Sobchack, Billy Stevenson, Andreas Sudmann.

The book appears first in an easily navigable web and mobile browser format from which chapter PDFs may be generated and saved (see the foot of each entry). The collection will shortly appear in a collected PDF edition, followed by EPUB and MOBI formats readable on most e-readers. Online at: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/post-cinema/.

2. The latest issue of SEQUENCE: Serial Studies in Media, Film and Music, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, and sequential edited-collection format has been published.

SEQUENCE Four: Analogue-Digital offers its readers, and potential interlocutors, space for reflection on the many forms and techniques of recombinatory media and culture. The inaugural contribution to this issue, and to this topic, is by Paul Atkinson, a specialist in the philosophy of science, media theory and visual culture, based at Monash University in Melbourne. Atkinson’s essay for SEQUENCE (4.1 [2016]— ‘THINKING WITH DIGITS: Cinema and the Digital-Analogue Opposition’ offers a compelling exploration of what is at stake when we deploy these, now binary terms. He sets out to clarify the representational differences between them, among other distinctions:

It is often pronounced that we live in a digital age and that our social and aesthetic beliefs are underpinned by the concept of digitality. But when a term is used to herald a broad cultural change it loses much of its specificity and critical purpose. The digital becomes a shibboleth of the new and its counterpart, the analogue, a locus for nostalgia and a presumed indexical connection with the real. We are at a point now in the study of media and cinema, when it is important to rethink both the analogue and the digital if they are to continue to have any critical value. This is not a plea to limit discussion to technological affordances, for the terms precede the many recent technologies to which they are applied. Rather it is a call to reconsider the digital-analogue distinction as a mode of representation and how this might apply to cinema. This is not just a matter of providing a clear definition in the manner favoured by philosophy, because any theoretical repositioning has to bear some relationship to the material, aesthetic and spectatorial aspects of cinema. The representational differences must affect the way we watch films as well as provide a means for understanding distinct filmmaking practices. In short, it is about redeploying the analogue-digital distinction as a mode of thinking in cinema – in terms of both reason and aesthetics – that extends well beyond the application of specific technologies.

 

3. TALKS@MFM REFRAME continues with its series of video and audio recordings of research presentations and masterclasses held at the School of Media, Film and Music, University of Sussex.

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Including: 

 

4. Mediático, Reframing Psychoanalysis, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates

AT MEDIÁTICO:

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AT REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS

 


AT THE AUDIOVISUAL ESSAY

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AT REFRAMING ACTIVISM:

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December Roundup: Reframing Psychoanalysis; Psychogeography of Lewes; TALKS@MFM; SEQUENCE on Godard and mashup; Other updates

  1. REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS website launched for the CHASE Psychoanalysis Network
  2. NEW PATHWAYS: A Psychogeography of Lewes and True Tales from the Old Hill projects launched
  3. TALKS@MFM – Our new series of recordings of research seminars and masterclasses
  4. New SEQUENCE on Re/De-Composition: Sampling, Mashups, Remix, Glitch
  5. Mediático, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates

 

REFRAME‘s latest round up of open access publications and research website and project launches is given below.

  1. REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS website launched for the CHASE Psychoanalysis Network

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REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS is a focus for research in psychoanalysis across the Consortium for Humanities and the Arts South-East England (CHASE). CHASE brings together nine leading institutions engaged in collaborative research activities in the arts and humanities, including an AHRC doctoral training partnership. These are the Universities of  East AngliaEssexKent and Sussex, the Open UniversityThe Courtauld Institute of ArtGoldsmiths, University of LondonBirkbeck, University of London and SOAS, University of London.

It is central to the CHASE ethos that serious disciplinary research is interdisciplinary, and should also encourage emerging fields of study and creative practice. CHASE includes a large number of faculty and doctoral researchers and practitioners engaged in psychoanalysis across a range of disciplines and inter-disciplines. Providing a platform for that research, the REFRAMING PSYCHOANALYSIS website engages with emerging forms of study in psychoanalysis, including experiments in new forms of attention and communication.  It will benefit in this endeavour from CHASE’s partnerships with leading organisations in the creative and public sectors. Also follow REPSYCHOANALYSE for news updates on Twitter.

 

2. NEW PATHWAYS: A Psychogeography of Lewes website and True Tales from the Old Hill project launched

Travel writing, like all life writing, is useful, truthful and sometimes beautiful. But in 2015, the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research at the University of Sussex jumped off track to enjoy the beauty of useless travelling and the art that can be made from it. We took to the town of Lewes for these micro-journeys, because Lewes is on our doorstep (the psychogeographer doesn’t need the exotic), because Lewes and its environs are dreamy, odd and old, if only faintly urban. While the town may be well known for its spectacular Bonfire Night revels (psychogeographical in their own way), we—researchers, writers, filmmakers, artists—got outside the guidebooks to play a little with the town, with truth and ourselves too.

We are now delighted to publish the results of this initiative on REFRAME: NEW PATHWAYS: A Psychogeography of Lewes. As a collection of concise written essays, photo essays, films, audio-recordings and ‘mappenings’, the psychogeographical works presented here uncover the usually ignored textures and soundscapes of the environment we traversed.

Also, on 1 December, a offline sister publication to New Pathways was launched: True Tales from the Old Hill, an anthology of life writing published in collaboration with the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research at the University of Sussex. Inspired by Paul Auster’s True Tales of American Life and edited by Rachel Cole and Jeremy Page with Katie Leacock and Sally Willow, the anthology includes more than fifty ‘true tales’ by contributors resident in or near Lewes, many of them – Mikey Cuddihy, Beth Miller, Minoli Salgado and Janet Sutherland among them – familiar names. True Tales from the Old Hill is available post free from The Frogmore Press also at £10.00 per copy.

 

3. TALKS@MFM REFRAME presents a new series of video and audio recordings of research presentations and masterclasses held at the School of Media, Film and Music, University of Sussex.

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Including: “Gleaning, Détournement and the Compilation Film: Some thoughts on For One More Hour With You / Un’ora Sola Ti Vorrei (Alina Marazzi, 2002)” by LAURA MULVEY (Professor of Film and Media Studies at Birkbeck, University of London) October 13th, 2015, [Video Recording] FURTHER DETAILS; Glass and Game: The Speculative Girl Hero by CATHERINE DRISCOLL (Professor of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney) September 30th, 2015. [Video recording] FURTHER DETAILS; and Explorations in the Dark: How I Told 300 Stories Without a Single Image” by MATT THOMPSON (Director of Rockethouse Productions) October 2015. [Video recording] FURTHER DETAILS

 

4. The latest issue of SEQUENCE: Serial Studies in Media, Film and Music, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, and sequential edited-collection format.

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SEQUENCE Three: Re/De-Composition: Sampling, Mashups, Remix, Glitch offers its readers, and potential interlocutors, space for reflection on the many forms and techniques of recombinatory media and culture. The inaugural contribution to this issue, and to this topic, is by Albertine Fox, a specialist in the later works of that most incorporative of filmmakers, Jean-Luc Godard.

Fox’s essay for SEQUENCE—’”EXTREME STATES: Remixing Cinema, Visual Art and Music in Godard’s Puissance de la parole (3.1 [2015])is an insightful exploration of the French filmmaker’s inventive techniques of fragmentation, decontextualization and recombination in his videographic work from the late 1980s, a period in which, as Fox argues, video came ‘into its own [both for Godard and other artists] as a poetic and interdisciplinary artistic force.’ For Fox, ‘Godard is devoted to the task of fearlessly re-instilling past forms of the image into new technological contexts, while embracing the instantaneousness of the medium’s present tense.’ She posits that in Godard’s version of the practice, ‘[v]ideo mashup is a plural form that thwarts our customary listening and viewing strategies, compelling us to participate in a volatile, arbitrary and indeterminate sense-making process’

 

5. Mediático, The Audiovisual Essay and Reframing Activism updates

AT MEDIÁTICO:

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AT THE AUDIOVISUAL ESSAY

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AT REFRAMING ACTIVISM:

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NEW website project: THE AUDIOVISUAL ESSAY – PRACTICE & THEORY

REFRAME_metaslider_AV_essay_no_readmoreREFRAME is excited to announce the launch of possibly its most international project to date, one with exciting connections to several highly esteemed publications in film and media studies, as well as important developments and events in our field.

The Audiovisual Essay is a new website devoted to the practice and theory of videographic film and moving image studies. This website will serve three main functions:

  • As an online repository for the papers, discussions and screening programme of an international conference and workshop on The Audiovisual Essay: Practice and Theory, organised by Adrian Martin and Cristina Álvarez López (supported by and Vinzenz Hediger of Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany). These events took place in November 2013 at the DeutschesFilmmuseum – Deutsches Filminstitut, in Frankfurt in partnership with Film and Audiovisual Media at Goethe University. The section of the website where these materials can be accessed — titled The Frankfurt Papers (co-edited by Cristina Álvarez López, Catherine Grant and Adrian Martin) — can be found here.
  • As a companion publication to issue 1.3 of the new peer-reviewed journal [in]Transition, A collaboration betweenMediaCommons and the Society for Cinema and Media Studies’ official publication, Cinema Journal, [in]Transition is the first peer-reviewed academic periodical specifically given over to videographic film and moving image studies. Issue 1.3(edited by Catherine Grant), was devoted to a sustained reflection on the practice and theory of the audiovisual essay form, with particular reference to its emerging procedures and uses in film and moving image criticism and research. The table of contents for this section (also edited by Catherine Grant) can be found here.
  • And it will also continue as a rolling publication for continuing reflections on and resources concerning the practice and theory of the audiovisual essay. The table of contents for this section (co-edited by Cristina Álvarez López, Catherine Grant, Chiara Grizzaffi, Hoi Lun Law, Adrian Martin, Lara Perski) can be found here.

Why not take a look at some of the emerging audiovisual approaches to audiovisual subjects: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/audiovisualessay/

Catherine Grant,
Producer/Director of the Audiovisual Essay website

Editor of REFRAME
September 2014

Latest news from REFRAME: Opera and the Media of the Future; Testament of Cocteau; MEDIÁTICO Video blog and more!

  1. Launch of the OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE website at REFRAME
  2. The latest REFRAME Conversations project: TESTAMENT OF COCTEAU – Orphée on film and in opera.
  3. New videoblog at MEDIÁTICO
  4. Study of controversial Spanish documentary ROCÍO, also at MEDIÁTICO

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REFRAME‘s latest round up of open access publications and research website launches is given below. Some further important launches will take place later this month, so be sure to come back for those!

1. Launch of the OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE website at REFRAME

Opera and the Media of the Future (OMF) is a new research initiative by The Centre for Research in Opera and Music Theatre (CROMT) to examine the challenges and opportunities of new media technologies for the future of opera. The project will be launched by a two-day event hosted by Glyndebourne Operabringing academics, artists and opera professionals together to examine a wide range of issues from opera cinecasts and webcasts to the use of new media platforms for audience development, marketing and education and the implications of new media for the forms of opera itself. The event will also include the presentation of two specially commissioned mini web operas. These will be published online by REFRAME/OMF. Click here for more information about OMFhttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/omf/

2. The latest REFRAME Conversations project: TESTAMENT OF COCTEAU 

For its latest video, REFRAME Conversations brought together two men with a shared interest in the life and work of French writer, artist and filmmaker Jean Cocteau:

The two discussed their mutual interest in Cocteau’s work and its legacy, with particular reference to Orphée as well as to Hughes and Morris’s operatic reinterpretation of the film. To watch the video please click herehttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/conversations/archive2014/testament-of-cocteau-orphee-on-film-and-in-opera/

3. New videoblog at MEDIÁTICO on Latin American remakes of US television series

MEDIÁTICO presented the first episode in its new, occasional, video blog series in which scholars and media practitioners reflect on aspects of Latin(o/a) American, Spanish and Portuguese media cultures. This inaugural vlog features founding co-editor Juan Ramos discussing an aspect of his Media and Cultural Studies PhD research on Latin TV dramas at the University of Sussex, in particular the phenomenon of Latin American remakes of US television series, including Metástasis, the Breaking Bad remake currently airing on US television. To watch the video and read an accompanying text, please click herehttp://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/mediatico/2014/08/18/vlog-ep-1-metastasis/

4. Study of controversial Spanish documentary ROCÍO at MEDIÁTICO

This website also brought us a brilliantly illustrated and highly informative essay by Rebecca Naughten on ROCÍO (Fernando Ruiz Vergara, 1980), an important Spanish documentary about repression and censorship in the immediate post-Francoist era: 

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End of July updates! SEQUENCE 1.3 & 1.4, new Mediático video essay, web opera winners and SusNet on Queer Feminist Media Praxis

FOUR great news items here at REFRAME today:

  1. New articles published at SEQUENCE One: Planet Melancholia
  2. New Eduardo Coutinho video essay tribute at MEDIÁTICO
  3. OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE Mini Web Opera Call – Result
  4. SusNet collaboration with ADA: A Journal of Gender, New Media and Technology

1. New articles published at SEQUENCE One: Planet Melancholia
SEQUENCE, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, sequential edited-collection,  is delighted to announce the publication of two further individual responses — by esteemed media studies scholars Richard Grusin and Selmin Kara — to Steven Shaviro’s magisterial article “MELANCHOLIA, Or The Romantic Anti-Sublime”, SEQUENCE 1.1 (2012), the launch essay for PLANET MELANCHOLIA, the inaugural issue of SEQUENCE, REFRAME‘s experimental, peer-reviewed, media, film and music studies serial publication.

Following Rupert Read’s engagement with Shaviro in SEQUENCE 1.2, which offered a personal, affective (and deeply philosophical) account of Lars von Trier’s 2011 film Melancholia, in their very fine, equally philosophically-informed, contributions Grusin and Kara turn their detailed attention, respectively, to the questions of “post-cinematic atavism” and “primordigitality” raised by the hybrid analog/digital technical and aesthetic contexts of a number of recent films, including Melancholia as well as Michel Hazanavicius’s The Artist (2011), Martin Scorsese’s Hugo (2011), Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life (2011), Benh Zeitlin’s Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), and Patricio Guzmán’s Nostalgia for the Light (2010) .

SEQUENCE continues to invite further responses to Shaviro’s article as well as to those which have followed it in the SEQUENCE One thread, as well as to SEQUENCE Two: We Need to Talk about the Maternal Melodrama‘.

2. New Eduardo Coutinho video essay tribute at MEDIÁTICO
Mediático, REFRAME‘s website devoted to Latin(o/a) American, Spanish and Portuguese media cultures, is proud to present a remarkable new video essay made in tribute to the work of the late Brazilian documentarist Eduardo Coutinho by Michael Chanan, Professor of Film and Video at Roehampton University, London. This work complements Mediático’s earlier published tribute to Coutinho, headed by a written study of his work by Cecilia Sayad.

3. OPERA AND THE MEDIA OF THE FUTURE Mini Web Opera Call – Result
The University of Sussex Centre for Opera and Music Theatre (CROMT) is delighted to announce the result of our recent Call for Proposals for a Mini Web Opera, to be showcased online and at the Opera and the Media of the Future event in October. The original call can be seen here:
http://www.soundandmusic.org/resources/opportunities/2014/mini-web-opera-call
The panel reviewed 17 proposals, and we were gratified by the amount of creativity and innovation on offer. We awarded modest development funds to two proposals:

The resulting works will be hosted on the REFRAME website network. So, watch this space!

The panel also wished to commend proposals from Elizabeth Swift, Jasmin Rodgman and Pietro Dossena.

4. SusNet collaboration with ADA: A Journal of Gender, New Media and Technology
In June, we announced the launch of SusNet, a new website published at REFRAME for the EPSRC CCN+ funded, Sustaining Networked Knowledge: Expertise, Feminist Media Production, Art and Activism Project (SusNet), based at the University of Sussex.

SusNet is coordinated by Kate O’Riordan and Aristea Fotopoulou and brings together feminist cultural production, art and activist practices and enables exchanges between different researchers, activists, artists and aims to contribute to knowledge exchanges across these areas and beyond.

Since the website launched, the special issue, edited by SusNet‘s coordinators, of ADA: A Journal of Gender, New Media and Technology — on Queer, Feminist Media Praxis — has been published and its contents can be found here: http://adanewmedia.org/issues/issue-archives/issue5/.

Announcing SusNet – Sustaining Networked Knowledge: Expertise, Feminist Media Production, Art and Activism

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REFRAME is delighted to announce the launch of SusNet, a new website published at its platform for the EPSRC CCN+ funded, Sustaining Networked Knowledge: Expertise, Feminist Media Production, Art and Activism Project (SusNet), based at the University of Sussex. SusNet is co-ordinated by Kate O’Riordan and Aristea Fotopoulou, with further input from other participants in the project.

The SusNet network brings together feminist cultural production, art and activist practices and enables exchanges between different researchers, activists, artists and aims to contribute to knowledge exchanges across these areas and beyond. Its primary nodes are the CCN+ Expertise Workshop, the 2013 Lesbian Lives Conference, the May 2013 Queer, Feminist Social Media Praxis workshop at the University of Sussex https://queerfemdigiact.wordpress.com/, the (forthcoming) special edition of ADA Issue 5: Queer, Feminist Media Praxis, http://adanewmedia.org, and the FemTechNet panel and SusNet launch at Postdigital: Critical Responses.
In bringing these nodes together the network aims to draw on a history of approaches to engagement with digital media, in order to stimulate new forms of engagement and to develop a flexible template for networked knowledge production. The SusNet website explores new publishing, research, teaching methods and archives. In its REFRAME iteration, it is intended to provide a dynamic platform for the mapping and visualization of the network nodes, people and content to provide an architecture of participation as well as embed content in a digital materialization of the network. The material archived at the REFRAME website is principally in video/blog format.

'Opera and the Media of the Future' Web Opera Commission and 'Unseen Enemy' Video

Two great news items here at REFRAME today:

  1. We announce a web opera commission for a new project Opera and the Media of the Future please scroll down for full details.
  2. A reminder that REFRAME has launched its latest Conversations project: its new video Unseen Enemy: War Stories in Public Spaces about the British National Army Museum’sUnseen Enemy” exhibition. The video had its world premiere in a screening at a panel on “Contemporary Soldiering, Self- representation and Popular Culture” at the 64th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, in Seattle, USA, on May 26th, 2014. You can watch it below and find further information about it at its very own REFRAME page: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/conversations/archive2014/unseen_enemy/

REFRAME announces a web opera commission for a new project Opera and the Media of the Future: A Sussex/Glyndebourne Research Initiative

The Centre for Research in Opera and Music Theatre at the University of Sussex announces a new research project with Glyndebourne Opera, to be initiated by a two-day event which will be held at Glyndebourne on 24th & 25th October, 2014.

Opera and the Media of the Future will bring together academics and opera professionals to consider the impact of opera cinecasts upon the way that audiences engage with opera today, and to look ahead to see how new digital, web-based and mobile media platforms might shape the future forms of opera.

Commission
We are pleased to announce a modest commission for a small web-based opera work to be ‘premiered’ at the conference in October. If accepted, this piece will be hosted by  REFRAME (http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/). It should be ready for testing by the 10th of October and will ‘go live’ on the 23rd.

Deadline for submission of proposals is 3rd July 2014. Results will be announced on July 17th. There will be an all-inclusive commission fee of £500.

The Brief:
This ‘opera’ will exist online. It will be encountered by its audience via a website, here at REFRAME. You may include mobile technology if you wish.  The opera may be any duration (including very short, as this is only a modest commission) or may not be time-based at all. It may have interactive elements. There will ideally be something to see, and something to hear. Preference will be given to the most innovative re-imaginations of the operatic form for this medium. You should consider the following questions:

  • What does opera ‘mean’ on this scale and through this medium?
  • How can you engage your audience?
  • What is your work’s relation to the ‘live’?
  • In what sense is it ‘operatic’ – eg are there elements of traditional opera such as singing, plot, spectacle, scenography, etc? Have you significantly re-imagined these elements?
  • Is there a sense (real or implied) that the opera is happening in a real place to which we are linked via the internet or is it taking place entirely in virtual space?

Please send via email, with subject heading ‘Web Opera Proposal’:

  • Your proposal (500 words)
  • Description of your technical needs (max 500 words)
  • Your CV

To:  Evelyn Ficarra <e.j.ficarra@sussex.ac.uk>

Quick round up!

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REFRAME News will be posting again very soon once REFRAME launches its latest Conversations project: its new video Unseen Enemy: War Stories in Public Spaces about the British National Army Museum’sUnseen Enemy” exhibition.

This video will receive its world premiere in a screening at a panel on “Contemporary Soldiering, Self- representation and Popular Culture” at the 64th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, in Seattle, USA, next Monday, May 26th, 2014.

In the meantime, there have been several new entries at REFRAME‘s new Musical Materialities website: Richard Elliott’s wonderful illustrated essay “Phonographic Voices,” part of “an ongoing study of attempts within the Anglophone critical establishment to understand, curate, evaluate and otherwise ‘master’ the musics of other cultures during the twentieth century”; Elodie Roy’s Faces, music, photographs; and another short entry on a “Manifesto for Music Technologists“.

You can also register for the Musical Materialities in the Digital Age conference (University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, 27-28 June 2014) at the website, too. Details of fees and payment methods can be found here.

There have been two updates at the Re.Framing Activism website: the first, Marina Fuser‘s discussion of issues of racism and the upcoming World Cup to be held next month in Brazil; and the second, a valuable collection of links to academic research and activist actions, focusing on the UK Independence Party.

REFRAME readers might also like to know of several upcoming “austerity related” research and community events which are sure to result in reports or research to be featured at this digital platform in the near future:

“Chronicles of Crisis: Public Culture, Austerity and Documentary in Greece” 

This one-day event (on May 30, 2014, at the University of Sussex) aims to bring together postgraduate students, early career researchers, and academics, as well as practitioners in order to discuss the role of documentaries in times of austerity, with a special, but not exclusive focus on the Greek debt crisis. While there has been a marked interest in contemporary Greek film, following the success of several art films at international film festivals, little critical attention has been paid to the growing number of documentaries, and particularly to those that are independently produced, which tend to be distributed through digital platforms and to act as exposés of various facets of the crisis. Organisers: Dr Eleftheria Lekakis and Dr Olga Kourelou. For further information and booking, please see http://www.eventbrite.com/e/chronicles-of-crisis-public-culture-austerity-and-documentary-in-greece-tickets-11680216843?aff=estw

“Austerity and us”

A community conference (May 31, 2014, in Brighton, East Sussex) on austerity, how we are experiencing it, perceiving it and fighting it in Brighton at the end of May. The conference is organised under the Public Culture Research Hub and the CNN+ at the University of Sussex, along with a range of campaigning, advocacy and political organisations from the local community and nationally, including Free University Brighton, People’s Assembly, Brighton Benefits Campaign, Brighton Hospitality Workers Campaign and more. This conference is organised by Dr Lee Salter and for further information please see: http://austerityandus.wordpress.com/.

Videos from the Nw/Thn Symposium Online at Mediamorphosis

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Four great video recordings are now viewable online of key sessions from the Nw/Thn: Documenting, Publishing and Disseminating Objects and Experiences workshop symposium, which took place at the University of Sussex on June 24, 2013. The event was oriented towards practice-based/led research students, faculty, working practitioners and professional creative organisations. This collaborative principle was reflected in the involvement of the Creative Critical Practice Research Group (CCPRG), REFRAME itself, and doctoral students from the University of Sussex, Royal College of Art, University of Brighton and University of West London.

As processes and materials generated by practice-based/led research cannot be directly published in the way traditional Arts and Humanities scholarship is, this symposium, set in an interactive and creative environment, offered training on and critical insight into how practice can be represented in DPD. Considering both digital and pre-digital modes of dissemination, NW/THN looked to interrogate two key questions: what do we lose or gain when we document and publish digitally? Are modes of DPD determined by the audiences aimed at by the work,  or/and the nature of the ‘output’? Because these questions have a resonance outside of academia, a collaborative, multi and crossdisciplinary discussion about applied approaches took place. The symposium was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and supported by the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, University of Sussex.

Videos of the following sessions are available at the Mediamorphosis website:

1. Gesture and Sound Interactions: research and applications by Frédéric Bevilacqua

Frédéric Bevilacqua is the head of the Real Time Musical Interactions team at IRCAM – Institute for Music/Acoustic Research and Coordination in Paris. His research concerns the understanding and modelling gesture-sound interactions, and the development of gesture-based musical interactive systems. He holds a master degree in physics and a Ph.D. in biomedical optics from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne). He also studied music at the Berklee College of Music in Boston and participated in several music and media arts projects. From 1999 to 2003 he was a researcher at the University of California Irvine. He joined IRCAM in October 2003 to develop gesture research for music and performing arts.

2. Ambulant Performance: The Cricket Seeks a Mate by Justin Grize

Justin Grize studied music composition at Carnegie Mellon University and Musical Theatre at Goldsmiths, University of London. Noticing a persistent animal presence in his own work as a composer and dramatist, from the song cycle Birds and Beasts to the verse tragedy The Hart, he joined the Centre for Research in Opera and Music Theatre at the University of Sussex as a PhD candidate, where his AHRC-funded practice-led project explores strategies of animal representation on the opera (and post-operatic) stage, with a particular focus on insects and other arthropods.

“the cricket seeks a mate” is part of the Ensiferan Variations, a group of works for voice based on the natural music-making activities of the crickets and katydids, collectively known as Ensifera.

Fuelled by a wonder at what might lie beyond the cognitive and perceptual barriers separating us from the ever-present yet essentially unknowable subjective world of animals, and guided by the principle that wherever possible, the work should reflect observed behaviours of its insect subjects, the piece draws on contemporary scientific understanding of Ensiferan musical practices as well as attempts from the 19th and early 20th centuries to transcribe or translate insect sound into a form reproducible by humans.

The Variations themselves are part of a loose collection of works called Arthropoda, which explores through music, sound, installation and performance the territory where our scientific, aesthetic and experiential understandings of invertebrate lives intersect, and is the practical component of an AHRC-funded PhD project investigating representations of animals on the opera stage.

This performance of “the cricket seeks a mate” is made possible through the additional support of CROMT.

3. //Semiconductor //Brilliant Noise by Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt

Semiconductor is UK artist duo Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt. Through moving image works they explore the material nature of our world, how we experience it and how we try to make an understanding of it, questioning our place in the physical universe. Their unique approach has won them many awards and prestigious fellowships, most recently the ‘Samsung Art + Prize UK’ 2012 for new media, the ‘Golden Gate Award for New Visions’ at San Francisco International Film Festival USA 2012 and the ‘Art and Science Award’ at Ann Arbor Film Festival USA 2012.

4. Documenting, Publishing and Disseminating Objects and Experiences – Plenary

Chaired by Professor Sally Jane Norman ( Professor of Performance Technologies and founding Director of the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts at Sussex).

Presenting REFRAME Conversations: Lizzie Thynne on film biography

REFRAME is back*, its website sporting a whole new look, to launch the first of a number of exciting academic publishing projects in this new academic year:      REFRAME Conversations, a series of in-depth explorations of media, film, music and cultural studies research, published and shareable on and offline in video/audio formats.

 

In the first of these video and audio encounters, Lizzie Thynne, filmmaker, writer and Senior Lecturer in Media and Film at the University of Sussex, discusses her theoretical and practice research into film biography. In REFRAME’s interview, as well as her earlier films Child of Mine (Channel Four Television, 1996) and Playing a Part: The Story of Claude Cahun (2004), and her written research on biographical, subjective and feminist filmmaking, Thynne talks about her recent experimental documentary On the Border (UK, 2013, 56 minutes), a daughter’s exploration of her Finnish family’s history prompted by the letters, objects, and photographs left in her mother’s apartment.

Fragmented memories, dreams, and diary entries are juxtaposed with the director’s journey to significant places and people in that history from during and after the Russo-Finnish wars, 1939 – 1944. Thynne’s mother, Lea, and her siblings were evacuated from the disputed border territory of Karelia. Lea’s father was killed in 1941, fighting alongside the Germans against the Soviets. His death in action is contrasted with the more indirect impact of the war and its aftermath on the destinies of the remaining family. In this hypnotic work of mourning and remembrance, past and present, associations, memory and imagining intertwine, as the film charts the lingering traces of conflict and exile across generations.

On the Border was published, alongside a written research statement by Thynne and peer-review reports on the work, in the peer-reviewed journal SCREENWORKS, Vol. 4, 2013: http://jmpscreenworks.com/?pid=thynne. Thynne’s films for the SISTERHOOD AND AFTER: The Women’s Liberation Oral History Project (British Library/University of Sussex) are online here: http://www.bl.uk/learning/histcitizen/sisterhood/about.html. Thynne’s chapter ‘The Space Between: Mothers and Daughters in Anne Trister’ first appeared in Tamsin Wilton (ed), Immortal Invisible: Lesbians and the Moving Image  (London: Routledge, 1995). For further details of Thynne’s other films and publications please go to: http://lizziethynne.co.uk

For those who’d like to see the film on a big screen, On the Border will be shown later this week at 7pm on Wednesday, October 9, at The Finnish Church, 33 Albion St, London SE16 7JG – free entry courtesy of the Finnish Church in association with the Anglo-Finnish Society. The screening will be followed by a discussion with participants: Lizzie Thynne, Titus Hjelm (UCL, School of Slavonic Studies) and Annette Kuhn (Queen Mary, University of London).

Further REFRAME Conversations will be published shortly. If you are interested in suggesting, making or contributing to a Conversation, please get in touch with REFRAME.

GO TO: REFRAME Conversations: Lizzie Thynne on Film Biography

[* During this relatively quiet summer (on the surface, at least), REFRAME‘s Re.Framing Activism website nonetheless kept up a lively and brilliant bi-weekly publishing schedule.]